calliopes_pen: (54 IJ Edith candles corridors)
([personal profile] calliopes_pen May. 23rd, 2017 12:29 pm)
Because I think we all need some mindless stuff at the moment, have a meme that I took from [personal profile] musesfool.

Cite the final line of five of your fics – your favorites, or the most recent ones.

1. There was still happiness yet to come...for both the living, as well as for the undead. Wrap The Cloak Of Night Around His Shoulders. Dracula (1968), following the wedding between Seward and Mina.

2. With this bittersweet chapter concluded, they would see to the rest of their lives. Let The Shadows Become Your Shroud. Crimson Peak (2015). That’s basically Alan and Edith limping off to see to their wounds, mourn Thomas, and just live, in the aftermath of a massive exorcism of a ghost from reality itself.

3. There was solace in the shadows, for both young and old vampires alike. Give Your Soul To The Night. Fright Night (1985). Jerry is revelling in winning as quietly as he can, while settling down for a nap, surrounded by turned teenagers, in his coffin in the basement.

4. Only the dead remained. Blood Begets A Curse Anew. Legend (1985). It probably is as grim as it sounds, as Darkness basically teleported a changed Lili (help me; I keep writing Lucy) out of the dining hall, after teleporting the goblins away to somewhere presumably unpleasant. Oh, and should anyone be curious about this story, do beware of a bit of animal sacrifice at the beginning, and references to torture in the middle.

5. And we gladly feast on those that would subdue us. Because We’re Addamses. Wednesday Addams is thinking, and thereby reiterating a statement made in the first Addams Family film.
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([personal profile] hollymath May. 23rd, 2017 05:46 pm)
And it's just as well I've got my passport and marriage certificate and stuff back, because I'm going to need them tomorrow because I've got a job interview.

For a job helping disabled people get jobs, so I think I'd be the best at it frankly, but we'll see.

Cue me finding this out at 4:30 this afternoon, it being at 11:10 tomorrow morning, and me wishing I could spend the rest of the evening looking for suitable clothes and identity documents and stuff (honestly, we get all our bills paperless if we can; it's hard to do this these days!).

And also having a big WI event to help with, starting in about half an hour, so I can't even a) properly devote myself to this or b) go to sleep, which is what after all this overwhelm I really want to do.
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([personal profile] hollymath May. 23rd, 2017 05:30 pm)
I owe Dreamwidth a much better post about this, but I also want everyone to know: today I found out my citizenship application had been approved and my passport and other important documents have been returned to me.

I'm not officially a citizen until I do the ceremony, which I should find out about in the next week or so. (While I continue to want no one there for that, I'm very happy to have as many people as want to and can, in a pub nearby waiting for me to be done with it.) But this is basically it. Done now. Until a few years ago, this would have made me indistinguishable from a person who's British because they're born in Britain. Our previous, immigrant-hating Home Secretary changed that, but it's still pretty good.

I am so grateful to all the people who backed my Kickstarter to make this application possible, to my friends who signed my application as references, to everyone who's told me that the UK is better for having me in it, and especially for Andrew who's into his second decade of tolerating the expense, stress and diminution of his own rights in his own country as the spouse of a foreigner. And that's even before the day-to-day horrors of me not letting him buy the hundred-quid six-CD set of one album that he doesn't like all that much anyway, and suchlike.
This is not in order of importance, but in order of how recently I heard of it.

1. Sir Roger Moore has passed away at the age of 89, following a “short but brave battle with cancer.” He will be best known for his role as James Bond, over the course of seven films. Sherlock Holmes fans may also remember that he was Holmes in the film Sherlock Holmes In New York (1976).

2. My condolences must also go out to Zack Snyder, his wife, and the rest of his family in the wake of a family tragedy. Snyder will be stepping down as the director of Justice League as he mourns the loss of his daughter, and requested that Joss Whedon direct additional material for him.

3. And lastly, but certainly not least: as the numbers confirmed to be both dead and injured continue to rise, my thoughts are with the families affected by the suicide bombing at Manchester yesterday. It just didn’t feel right to post condolences and not mention this one as well. Here’s James Corden’s message to Manchester.
rmc28: Rachel standing in front of the entrance to the London Eye pier (Default)
([personal profile] rmc28 May. 23rd, 2017 02:11 pm)
There are two things coming up I want to see, and would like to encourage friends to come see with me. I'm not quite at "buy a ticket to something fun" today, but I'd like to get there.  Please comment / message / email me if you're interested in coming too, ideally by this weekend.

Show one:
The Southwark Playhouse is putting on Working, a musical with songs by "Craig Carnelia, Micki Grant, Lin-Manuel Miranda, Mary Rodgers & Susan Birkenhead, Stephen Schwartz and James Taylor". So obviously Lin-Manuel's contribution is among lots of other people's, but the musical blurb itself sounds interesting: based on a book of "interviews with the American workforce" and "a strikingly dynamic and contemporary look at what it is to work and what it is to be a musical".  Also I like the theatre's access information page which seems a better effort than most and would therefore like to Turn Up And Support This Kind Of Thing.

I'm looking at going to the 3pm show on Saturday 10th June.  This is both my least-busy Saturday during the run, and immediately after my exams.  Tickets £25 / £20.


Show two:
There is a touring professional production of Bring It On, the cheerleader musical, which I saw a local amateur production of recently. I am considering either:
  • 2:30pm show on Saturday 23rd September, at the Milton Keynes Theatre
  • 2:30pm show on Saturday 14th October, at the New Wimbledon Theatre
Both of them are do-able as a day trip from Cambridge by public transport.  I lean slightly toward the Wimbledon one because that's by train not coach, but I could be persuadable to either.  (Both is probably overambitious).  Tickets are between £43 and £57.50, plus a transaction fee (because of course there is).


Also, I'm looking longingly at an amateur production of In The Heights in Birmingham 14-15 July, but as I'm running a child's birthday party on 16th July I don't think it's going to happen.

(yes, I am mildly obsessive about Seeing All The Things related to Lin-Manuel Miranda, but I also kind of like the idea of aspiring to a lifestyle of travelling the country seeing musicals ...)
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([personal profile] hollymath May. 23rd, 2017 11:44 am)
This morning, [personal profile] white_hart shared a quote from C.S. Lewis:
"If we are all going to be destroyed by an atomic bomb, let that bomb when it comes find us doing sensible and human things - praying, working, teaching, reading, listening to music, bathing the children, playing tennis, chatting to our friends over a pint and a game of darts - not huddled together like frightened sheep and thinking about bombs. They may break our bodies (a microbe can do that) but they need not dominate our minds."
If we'd been much later, it'd have found Andrew and I on a tram home from a lovely night out.

One of Andrew's friends who lives in Australia was in Bury doing some work, and invited us out for dinner with him, his wife and the people they'd been working with all day, recording an audio drama for a podcast. It was a lot of fun, and it's always good to see Andrew enjoy himself in social situations, especially ones where people tried to guess his second-favorite Beatles album.

And because his friend was in Bury, we got a train to town and then a tram to Bury. Chatting idly along the way about how long it'd been since we'd been to Bury, having flashbacks at the tram stop that we used to use all the time when I first met Andrew, what kind of commute I'd have if I got a job I applied for, which would involve one of the tram stops along the way. On the way back, we were nearly half-asleep.

The tram went through Victoria station, right next to the entrance to the arena, about an hour before the bomb.

I went home and almost straight to bed. I already had an e-mail from my mom asking if I was all right, when I still thought this might have been a speaker blowing up or something that had spooked people. We were surprised she'd heard about it so quickly (if my parents knew how, I'm sure they'd set up a google alert for "incidents in the UK" and e-mail me about all of them, but barring that I have no idea how they manage).

I did not tell her I'd been on a tram going past there an hour before.

This morning I woke up to another e-mail from her asking if Andrew's family (the only other people she knows in the country) were okay, and it was all I could do not to tell her that I couldn't imagine any of them being at at an Ariana Grande concert.

No, those are for kids. I can't handle thinking of all the teenagers' parents today.

I woke up to other e-mails too, one from my old "blind teacher" who I hadn't heard from in years. People in North America had been fretting about us while we slept. FB and skype messages too, when I hadn't even thought I was logged into skype. By the time I read and could respond to them, the people who'd written them were asleep, hopefully not too worried about us.

One of those North Americans was awake, and upon hearing that we and ours are fine, said, "YEESH thank goodness yet it is still awful so be kind to yourselves PLEASE, eh?"

I hadn't thought of this as something I needed to be kind to myself about, but I replied to my friend, "Such a sad demographic to lose people from: the pictures being shared around social media of people who are still missing are of fourteen, fifteen year olds. I am having to be a bit careful around it actually for all the mentions of grieving parents, which inevitably remind me of my grieving parents saying no one's kids should die before them. I hope the strangers do no mind that my eyes are wet with tears for me as well as for them."

In his invariably lovely way, he said, "Of course that's what grieving is all about, dear Holly. My loss is your loss, your loss is mine. We're all in this together, though most of the time we don't see it. For you to think of your own family in this way shows a great respect for what other people are suffering with: connect us all together, connect you to me and me to you."
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([personal profile] miss_s_b posting in [community profile] gallifrey_times May. 23rd, 2017 09:32 am)
Welcome to the Tuesday the 23rd of May edition of Gallifrey Times!

Editor's Note: I ❤ MCR.

- Discussion, Reactions, Reviews and News -
- Podcasts and Audiovisual Discussion -
- Challenges, Prompts and Announcements relating to Fanworks -


GT aims to cover Doctor Who Universe news and fan activity on Dreamwidth and beyond. If you'd like to be added to our watch list, please leave a comment here. Questions? If you can't find the answer on our profile, you can contact the editors by commenting on any edition of the newsletter.
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([personal profile] miss_s_b May. 23rd, 2017 11:00 am)
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([personal profile] white_hart May. 23rd, 2017 09:02 am)
I saw this quote from CS Lewis's "On Living in an Atomic Age" on FB (or maybe Twitter?) a while ago, and it comes to mind again today, for obvious reasons.

If we are all going to be destroyed by an atomic bomb, let that bomb when it comes find us doing sensible and human things - praying, working, teaching, reading, listening to music, bathing the children, playing tennis, chatting to our friends over a pint and a game of darts - not huddled together like frightened sheep and thinking about bombs. They may break our bodies (a microbe can do that) but they need not dominate our minds.
The police have confirmed it as a terrorist attack, although not the stripe of terrorism.
But we know what terrorists want, don't we?
The clue is in the name.

They want us to be afraid.
They want us to cower in our homes, afraid to go to gigs or theatres or sports events.
They want us to give in to fear and authoritarianism.

FUCK THEM.

There's already lots of people sharing practical ways you can help in Manchester today - three examples here - but what if you are nowhere near Manchester? And what about the future?

One way you can show your defiance today?
Buy a ticket. Buy a ticket to a gig, or a football match, or a play, or anything else where lots of people gather to enjoy themselves and be human. Let today be the biggest day for ticket sales to fun things the UK has ever seen.
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miss_s_b: (Britishness: Tea)
([personal profile] miss_s_b May. 23rd, 2017 08:03 am)
Manchester is less than an hour from my home. I have lots of friends there, and I visit there often. The station I most often arrive at is Manchester Victoria.
Less than a fortnight ago I took my little girl to an arena concert in a big city.
So yeah, this is hitting home hard.

BUT.

But.

The arsehole who blew himself up with an IED full of nuts and bolts at a concert full of little girls was one man.

The people who immediately took to the streets with bottles of water and cups of tea? The people who opened their homes to strangers for a sit down or a phone charger or a phone? The taxi drivers who offered free rides home when the trains were cancelled, the hotels who offered free rooms and respite and drinks to those affected, and the absolute heroes of the emergency services? Those people are legion. Those people are the ones who we need to talk about. Those people are the peak of humanity.

Love, not hate.
Helping, not hurting.

No party politics today, people. No Yorkshire/Lancashire joking. Today we stand together. Please?
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([personal profile] naraht May. 22nd, 2017 08:56 pm)
• I've ordered, from Japan, a tenugui towel with an udon noodle design. It seemed like a good idea at the time, and to be fair the shipping was only £1.50. All the designs are amazing, but I was particularly struck by this. (Tell me that Yuuri Katsuki doesn't take one to the rink with him.)

• I also seem to be buying excessive quantities of culottes. (Well, two pairs, but you know.) For once I'm on trend. I know I have to buy now, before they disappear for another twenty years. I hate the fashion cycle.

Victor isn't the only one who has a phone case of himself

• This weekend I'm going to Belgium, and it's now clear that it's going to be boiling hot, like 28C/83F on Sunday. Currently reconsidering my packing list, plans, life choices, etc. (Don't laugh, people from elsewhere.) I still plan on climbing the Wall of Geraardsbergen but I'll have to do it early in the morning. And, you know, on foot. Needless to say.
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([personal profile] purplecat May. 22nd, 2017 08:23 pm)


At the University Open House during Liverpool Light Night


For context, John Higgins was giving a talk to go with an exhibition of his art in the Victoria Gallery and Museum, where the Open House was taking place.
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([personal profile] choco_frosh May. 22nd, 2017 07:39 am)
Reading List:

Paper Girls
Left Hand of Darkness
Last Things, Marissa Moss
miss_s_b: (Default)
([personal profile] miss_s_b May. 22nd, 2017 11:00 am)
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([personal profile] hollymath May. 22nd, 2017 09:38 am)
Andrew wrote a book! Set during the second world war, it's a novel about Alan Turing, Aleister Crowley, Ian Fleming and Dennis Wheatley who combine math, magic and espionage in what ends up sounding like one of Wheatley's novels.

This sounds like the last kind of thing I would read normally, but I really enjoyed it! (And I'm not just saying that because sales will help pay our bills!)
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miss_s_b: (Who: Ainley!Master bad influence)
([personal profile] miss_s_b posting in [community profile] gallifrey_times May. 22nd, 2017 08:37 am)
Welcome to the Monday the 22nd of May edition of Gallifrey Times!

- Discussion, Reactions, Reviews and News -
- Podcasts and Audiovisual Discussion -
- Fanworks -

Fic: (rating; characters/pairings)
GIFsets, Caps, and Photosets:


GT aims to cover Doctor Who Universe news and fan activity on Dreamwidth and beyond. If you'd like to be added to our watch list, please leave a comment here. Questions? If you can't find the answer on our profile, you can contact the editors by commenting on any edition of the newsletter.
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([personal profile] choco_frosh May. 21st, 2017 09:30 pm)
Gah, right, I never did that post about the rest of my trip to Maine because...well, if I'm honest, mostly because I've been spending too much time playing a bellringing practice game in my iPhone.* Have the condensed version of most of three weekends.

The rest of a weekend in Maine )

LAST weekend: Well, there were no horseshoe crabs (too early in the season), and I didn't get in as much ringing as I'd've liked (or talk Peter into seeing the mosaics), but I got to call the bells into Jennys and Peter and I made sand Pokémon and flew a kite, so it was a pretty ok day. And Sunday my copy of Ursula Vernon's latest unexpectedly showed up in the mail, so that was a pretty ok day overall too.

And I think I'm gonna stop now, because I stayed up til midnight on Friday devouring The Long Way to a Small Angry Planet and I didn't really get to catch up last night, and I've had probably more ice cream than you should eat in one sitting, and so I think it's time to keel over again.


* I guess I also owe you a post on "Bellringing and how it is awesome but also horribly addictive".
** In which I was glad to discover neither of their cats had barfed, since apparently they'd been doing that...
The silver lining of having a cold is that I have finally managed to start watching this series of Doctor Who (haven't seen the last two episodes, no spoilers please). I'm enjoying it quite a lot, but I did spend the first episode imagining what it would be like to be the Head of Department in a department with the Doctor in it...

------

'We're supposed to have an agreement. I give you an office, a lecture slot, and an admittedly modest salary. In return, you teach what you like with no questions asked, and give me four REF-able articles. Four 4* REF-able outputs that I can actually submit, unlike the ones you emailed me last week.'

'What's wrong with them?'

'They're on medieval Armenian poetry and we're the philosophy department.'

'Where's your imagination? I'm sure you can find a use for them. They're very good articles.'

'I know , I had them read by someone who can actually read Armenian. She said that they were the best work she'd seen in her career, and incidentally wherever did you find that new manuscript?

'I know that you don't like the REF, Doctor. Most of your colleagues don't like it either. As the person who has to deal with everybody else not liking it, I inevitably hate it. But until you give me four articles in a subject relevant to an existing University department or, if you prefer, invent time travel and stop it happening in the first place, I shall continue to nag you to ensure that you adhere to the terms of our agreement. Here's a list of departments. Four outputs, or time travel, Doctor, it's up to you.'

[worp worp]

'Of course we can add medieval Armenian poetry to the lecture list next year. Now if you could just remember that I will need your entry for the Great University Bake-Off Biscuit Challenge by Friday that would be great.'

-----

Meanwhile in the real-life department of Be Careful What You Wish For Studies, this gem from the Wikipedia article on the RAE:

The committee received submissions of research statements from 37 subject areas ("cost centres") within Universities, along with five selected research outputs.

[...]

A subsequent research assessment was conducted in 1989 under the name "research selectivity exercise" by the Universities Funding Council. Responding to the complaint of the Universities that they weren't allowed submit their "full strength," Swinnerton-Dyer allowed the submission of two research outputs per every member of staff.


And so the madness began.
.

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